Aggressive cancer no treatment

Introduction: The coexistence of pituitary adenoma and meningiomas is very rare.

aggressive cancer no treatment

It is debatable if meningiomas result as a consequence of hormone dependent growth or secondary to radiation. We report a rare case of coexisting brain tumors: a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma and two meningiomas in a year-old female patient.

aggressive cancer no treatment

Case report: Onset at 46 years with bitemporal hemianopsia, without other clinical complaints. Hormonal balance revealed secondary thyroid and gonadal insufficiency with hyperprolactinemia for which Cabergoline was started with initial good evolution.

Three years later, acute intracranial hypertension was solved by partial transcranial adenomectomy. Gamma knife radiation completed the treatment, with subsequent secondary adrenal and thyroid insufficiency.

Same year, the patient underwent a subtotal thyroidectomy for nodular goiter.

aggressive cancer no treatment

After 4 years of treatment with variable doses of cabergoline, the progressive tumor growth imposed a new intervention – transsphenoidal adenomectomy, with initially good evolution. One year later Postoperatory, the patient complains of gait dysfunction, nausea, and headache.

aggressive cancer no treatment

Clinically, left cranial nerves paresis X, XI, and Xll was objectified. Hormonal investigations confirmed pituitary insufficiency thyroid, adrenal and aggressive cancer no treatment axeswith normal prolactin levels. Currently, she is on thyroid and corticoid substitution, without dopamine agonists, with specific neurologic symptomatic treatment.

aggressive cancer no treatment

Conclusions: Recent studies have revealed the existence of prolactin receptors in meningioma, thus explaining the proliferative effect. In our case we may explain the growth of meningiomas not only secondary to the invasive prolactinoma, but as well as radiation induced.

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aggressive cancer no treatment

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